Origin

Arises from the lower and inner impression on the back part of the tuberosity of the ischium, by a tendon common to it and the semitendinosus, and from the lower part of the sacrotuberous ligament

Insertion

The head of the fibula which articulates with the back of the lateral tibial condyle

Action(s)

Both heads of the Biceps Femoris perform knee flexion. Since the long head originates in the pelvis it is also involved in hip extension. The long head of the biceps femoris is a weaker knee flexor when the hip is extended (because of active insufficiency). For the same reason the long head is a weaker hip extender when the knee is flexed.

When the knee is semi flexed, the Biceps femoris in consequence of its oblique direction rotates the leg slightly outward

Nerve Supply

Tibial nerve

Arterial Supply

Inferior gluteal artery, perforating arteries, popliteal artery

Physical Exam

Enter physical examination maneuvers for muscle

Clinical Importance

Enter clinical importance of muscle

Disease States

Enter links to pages where muscle involved

Discussion

The fibers of the long head form a fusiform belly, which passes obliquely downward and lateralward across the sciatic nerve to end in an aponeurosis which covers the posterior surface of the muscle, and receives the fibers of the short head; this aponeurosis becomes gradually contracted into a tendon, which is inserted into the lateral side of the head of the fibula, and by a small slip into the lateral condyle of the tibia.

From the posterior border of the tendon a thin expansion is given off to the fascia of the leg. The tendon of insertion of this muscle forms the lateral hamstring; the common peroneal nerve descends along its medial border.

Figures

Click thumbnail for larger image

Credits:

From Wikipedia:
Biceps femoris

Attachments: