Origin

Fibula

Insertion

First metatarsal, medial cuneiform

Action(s)

Plantar flexion, eversion

Nerve Supply

Superficial fibular (peroneal) nerve

Arterial Supply

Fibular (peroneal) artery

Physical Exam

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Clinical Importance

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Disease States

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Discussion

It is attached proximally to the head of the fibula and its ‘belly’ runs down most of this bone. It becomes a tendon that goes posteriorly around the lateral malleolus of the ankle, then continues under the foot to attach to the 1st metatarsal.

It arises from the head and upper two-thirds of the lateral surface of the body of the fibula, from the deep surface of the fascia, and from the intermuscular septa between it and the muscles on the front and back of the leg; occasionally also by a few fibers from the lateral condyle of the tibia. Between its attachments to the head and to the body of the fibula there is a gap through which the common peroneal nerve passes to the front of the leg.

It ends in a long tendon, which runs behind the lateral malleolus, in a groove common to it and the tendon of the Peronæus brevis; the groove is converted into a canal by the superior peroneal retinaculum, and the tendons in it are contained in a common mucous sheath.

The tendon then extends obliquely forward across the lateral side of the calcaneus, below the trochlear process, and the tendon of the peroneus brevis, and under cover of the inferior peroneal retinaculum.

It crosses the lateral side of the cuboid, and then runs on the under surface of that bone in a groove which is converted into a canal by the long plantar ligament; the tendon then crosses the sole of the foot obliquely, and is inserted into the lateral side of the base of the first metatarsal bone and the lateral side of the medial cuneiform.

Occasionally it sends a slip to the base of the second metatarsal bone.

The tendon changes its direction at two points: first, behind the lateral malleolus; secondly, on the cuboid bone; in both of these situations the tendon is thickened, and, in the latter, a sesamoid fibrocartilage (sometimes a bone), is usually developed in its substance.

Figures

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Credits:

From Wikipedia:
Peroneus longus

Attachments:


peroneus longus.png (image/png)