Starting Position



The subtaral joint is responsible for inversion and eversion of the foot. Inverson of the foot describes medial movement of it’s plantar aspect. Eversion of the foot describes lateral movement of it’s plantar aspect. To assess foot inversion and eversion the patient may be seated or in the prone position. In either position the foot should be grossly aligned with the tibial crest and will be slightly plantar flexed. The examiner should place one hand around the ankle for stabilization and the other hand around the calcaneus for manipulation. The examiner can then rotate the calcaneus to examine inversion and eversion.

Ending position



A normal ankle will invert to 40° and evert to 20°.

Clinical Significance



Difficulty with either inversion or eversion in a pediatric population suggests tarsal coalition. Difficulty with either inversion or eversion in an adult population suggests remote calcaneal fracture. Instability

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