Origin

Body of tibia

Insertion

Medial cuneiform and first metatarsal bones of the foot

Action(s)

Dorsiflexion and Inversion of the foot

Nerve Supply

Deep fibular (peroneal) nerve

Arterial Supply

Anterior tibial artery

Physical Exam

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Clinical Importance

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Disease States

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Discussion

Function:

The tibialis anterior muscle is the most medial muscle of the anterior compartment of the leg. It functions to stabilise the ankle as the foot hits the ground during the contact phase of walking (eccentric contraction) and acts later to pull the foot clear of the ground during the swing phase (concentric contraction). It also functions to ‘lock’ the ankle, as in toe-kicking a ball, when held in an isometric contraction.

Antagonists are plantar-flexors of the posterior compartment such as soleus and gastrocnemius.

Essentially, the movements of tibialis anterior are dorsiflexion and inversion of the ankle. However, actions of tibialis anterior are dependent on whether the foot is weight bearing or not (closed or open kinetic chain). When the foot is on the ground the muscle helps to balance the leg and talus on the other tarsal bones so that the leg is kept vertical even when walking on uneven ground.

Variations:

A deep portion of the muscle is rarely inserted into the talus, or a tendinous slip may pass to the head of the first metatarsal bone or the base of the first phalanx of the great toe.

The tibiofascialis anterior, a small muscle from the lower part of the tibia to the transverse or cruciate crural ligaments or deep fascia.

Figures

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Credits:

From Wikipedia:
Tibialis anterior

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